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Hydrangea
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Common Names: Hydrangea
Botanical Name:  Hydrangea (hi-DRAN-jee-ah)
Availability:  May through November, peak supply July through September.
Vase Life:  5 to 10 days.
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Copyright 1999 - 2001
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Floral Design Institute, Inc.

Storage Temperature:  36 - 38 F
Ethylene Sensitive:  Yes
Description: Large rounded clusters of florets with star-like petals.
Colors: White, pinks and blues.
Botanical Facts: The name is from the Greek words hydro (water) and aggos (jar) referring to the fruits which are shaped like cups.
Design Notes: A wonderful mass flower with beautiful coloration and textural interest in large arrangements.  Hydrangeas are very popular in wedding design.
Purchasing Hints:  Purchase brightly colored, full flower heads with well hydrated leaves.
Conditioning:  Remove all foliage that will be below the water line. Cut under water with a sharp knife.  Hydrate in a solution of warm water and commercial floral preservative / floral food for two hours before storage or usage.
Additional Notes:  Hydrangeas are very wilt sensitive and can be very tricky to work with.  If after general procedures for hydration the blossoms still wilt, recut the stem ends then place them in a clean vase with four inches of boiling water.  Allow the flowers to hydrate for several hours before storage or usage. 

If harvesting hydrangea blossoms from your garden for use as a cut flower, do not select young blossoms.   Harvest blossoms that have been on the plant longer.  Cut the stems below the new green growth and into the woody portion of the stem.  Then,  recut the stem ends and place them in a clean vase with four inches of boiling water.  Allow the flowers to hydrate for several hours before storage or usage.  Be aware that some cultivars of hydrangea simply will not hydrate as a cut flower.

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