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Arrangement for Mom

Have you planned your flowers for Mother's Day? There's no time like now! In this Flower School How-To Video Leanne shares a casual, foam-free design of luxurious blooms. Mixing and matching interesting textures and classic hues of pink she creates a floral feast for the eyes. Enjoy!

Video Transcription

Flowers for Mother's Day? Here at Floral Design Institute, we have so many fabulous blooms. Today I wanted to share with you how to do foam-free, casual using interesting flowers, and mixing and matching using a traditional color palette of pink for mom.

When choosing the materials, I went for blousy, multiple petal blooms. Things that we love, peonies, ranunculus, scabiosa, roses, lisianthus, all the favorites. Working with the traditional pink palette. The mechanics? Going for a natural armature. I started with curly willow. Important. Make sure it's very pliable, fresh, not dried. Tuck it down in the vessel. Think about your studies in flower school, we taught you this. Then I anchored it in place using clear waterproof tape.

To begin, you start with a nest of foliage. And if you know me, you know that I love to use a variety of different things. Huckleberry gives a very strong base. Fatsia, oh so dramatic. Tucking it down, making sure that it will stay down below the water line. Then a bit of Israeli ruscus, coming upward. And for fun, a little bit of dusty miller. Breaking off any damaged leaves. Saving them, because I can always use them for something else. And then giving it a cut and tucking it deeply so that it reaches the water.

The flowers, using a radial binding point. Working in a traditional round format but softening it just like I did with the foliage. So again, similar to what you learned in Floral Design basic 101 but softened and a little more interest with a variety of materials. Notice the depth. Peonies, some open so it is beautiful right now. And then some still tightly closed so that they'll be beautiful later as the arrangement matures. Angling them through that central binding point. Lisianthus, even the buds are so graceful. Letting them come out, extending a little longer. Blooms, placing them in. Coming back, the scabiosa. Oh, so delicate. Tucking that in, getting the contrast in hues. The ranunculus, the heads, so beautiful. Again, giving it a cut and placing it in.

As a final enhancement, a little bit of impact. Some beautiful snowberry in the soft pink gives a little bit of weight, some heaviness and adds texture and interest. Then for softness. So yes, we added heaviness and softness. Little bit of jasmine vine, pulling off strands, dividing it out, and then letting it cascade softly to the side, extending the design, draping down to the tabletop, and repeating that. Maybe even coming slightly to the front. The jasmine smells divine and it holds so well. And coming out to the opposite side, and then turning and making sure everything is full and luxurious.

The recipe, I worked in threes. Three peony, three blueberry rose, scabiosa, ranunculus, lisianthus, snowberry, and three jasmine. The base, huckleberry, fatsia and dusty miller. It all blends together so fabulously.

Working foam-free is easy when you understand your alternative mechanics. Working casual and carefree is easy when you understand your elements and your principles. For more creative inspiration and education, check out the website Flower School .com. If you have questions, you can reach us through there. But now it's your turn, gather your most fabulous blooms. Make sure you have a good color palette, and create a way, take a picture, post it on social media, hashtag Floral Design Institute. That way we all can see what you do as you do something you love.

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