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Blush and Classic Blue

In this Flower School How-To Video leanne worked with a surprise package of flowers. Her starting point was a focus on the Pantone Color of the Year, Classic Blue. She then filled the arrangement with a a variety of Blush flowers all from Florabundance.com. The finished arrangement designed in a compote with a chicken wire armature, foam free and absolutely stunning. Enjoy!

Video Transcription

Welcome to the Flower School .com video library. I'm Leanne Kesler, director of the Floral Design Institute, and today I'm here to share a wonderful arrangement with you, starting with the Classic Blue, the Pantone Color of the Year, and adding in beautiful blooms in a variety of blush tones.

As I was preparing this video, I didn't know what flowers were going to be available. It was getting a little bit challenging. So I decided to make it easy on myself and not go for specifics. I just focused on a color palette and I started with the Classic Blue. The delphinium, the eryngium, perfect for that. Then I said, I just want a variety of blush items, and the specialists at Florabundance.com, they gathered all these gorgeous things, and you can see, they're stunning. I didn't know what I was going to get, but I knew it would be fabulous. I got peonies, lisianthus, garden roses, and of course the Classic Blue.

For mechanics, going old school, foam-free, working with floral netting. So I just cut a piece off the roll and then crunched it up, creating an armature, taped it into place, then added fresh water with flower food. I like to start with a little bit of foliage first. Maybe some Italian ruscus, cutting it down, and then feeding it into the armature. Repeating that. Then following Leanne's rule of at least three different foliages. Maybe bringing in a little bit of pittosporum. Setting it in place, weaving it into the armature. Maybe a fatsia leaf. Again, setting it in, and then adding more foliage to create a nice nest to support the blooms later.

As I begin the design, I like to add my lines in first. Plus, it brings the Classic Blue right in at the very beginning. The delphinium is so grand, has nice buds, as well as the blooms. Just giving it a cut, then setting it in. Then adjusting, because it's all going to lean a little bit, so you have to find where it's going to set the best, drawing the eye into the arrangement, supporting it with the other items. Maybe a third stem, carrying the eye towards the back, and then repeating the line coming through on the opposite side, drawing eye from left to right, so that it carries your eye through the arrangement. And then thinking about balance. Long enough to one side, long enough to the opposite side, to place everything perfectly asymmetrically balanced.

Next is the focal emphasis. I need to get visual weight right in the center to support all of the lines that are extending outward. Peonies, so lush, so grand. Cutting it and making sure it goes deeply into the water because they are thirsty blooms. Nestling it into the armature. Maybe a second one, to pull the eye on back into the center of the design. Then coming in with some beautiful Juliet garden roses, that soft peach hue. Some coming towards the front and some coming towards the back.

Once you have your lines and your focal emphasis, design gets fun. Then you start adding just your favorite things to add contrast, to finish the color harmony, to provide a bit of texture. So I started looking through all the treasures that Florabundance sent. Of course, the eryngium. The beauty with this is it brings that Classic Blue into the center and adds more texture. Bringing it in, helping to carry the eye from side to side. Grouping a bit, and of course, bringing it out to the back as well. Lisianthus, so frilly and super long-lasting. Bringing that blush out towards the side. Repeating on the opposite side. Out towards the back. And then some delightful, delicate butterfly ranunculus, letting them be long, coming out a bit over the top. And lastly, a little bit of jasmine vine, letting it trail outward, creating movement from side to side and enhancing the lines of the delphinium.

As I finish, I think again about my lines and my balance and the asymmetrical movement, maybe adding another of the delphinium coming out to the side, filling in a bit. Maybe one more coming up a little taller, angled right in. Then another jasmine vine coming out to the opposite side, adding a little length. And lastly, a tiny bit more contrast, bringing in some silver dollar eucalyptus. Just small bits, letting it tuck in, helping to break the line of the container. Feeding it in, just bringing that little bit of contrast in color, repeating, and again.

The recipe for this design, everything came from Florabundance.com. I started with foliage. Three stems of Italian ruscus, three fatsia, and then three bits of pittosporum. Then I added my lines, 10 stems of the delphinium belladonna. Then I went to the focal emphasis with two peonies and five of the Juliet garden roses. Then I had fun adding all the contrast. Three stems of Eryngium, three stems of butterfly ranunculus, five stems of lisianthus, and five stems of jasmine vine. Lastly, a tiny bit of silver dollar eucalyptus to add that final touch of contrast.

Taking inspiration from the Pantone Color of the Year, Classic Blue, and then adding in blush flowers makes a design that's so beautiful and on trend. You'll find more creative inspiration at the website, Flower School .com. If you have questions, you can reach us through there or pick up the telephone and give us a call at 503-223-8089. Now it's your turn. What are you going to create, including Classic Blue in your designs? Gather your flowers, make something fabulous. Take a picture, post it on social media, and tag Floral Design Institute. That way we all can see what you do, as you do something you love.

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