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Candle Ring Centerpiece

Christmas centerpieces can be traditional yet updated and contemporary. In this video how-to demonstration Leanne creates a spectacular birch bark wrapped centerpiece using garden roses from GardenRosesDirect.com. Instead of the traditional complementary color palette of red and green she uses a split compliment of green, red-orange and red-violet. A pillar candle and a garland of cranberries and bits of birch bark threaded on silver metallic wire enhances the design. Enjoy!

Video Transcription

Welcome, to the Flower School .com video library. I'm LeAnne Kesler, Director of the Floral Design Institute and today I'm in the studio with fabulous garden roses from GardenRosesDirect.com and accenting materials from Florabundance.com. This updated centerpiece is grand. Going from the compliment of red and green to a split compliment of green with red-orange and red-violet.

The base, a 13" wreath ring pre-soaked with flower food, ready to go. Then with the holidays, I love the evergreens. So some fragrant cedar, that will be the base. Then from GardenRosesDirect.com two different red hues of the garden rose. Going to the red/orange with the Piano and to the red-violet with Tess. Then accented with antique carnations and nigella. This a real contemporary vibe to the traditional Christmas colors.

The wreath ring will have both an interior and exterior wrap to begin hiding the mechanics. Taking the cedar, cutting it down and then just laying it on the interior, inserting it into the foam and then winding it around, anchoring it in place using a greening pin, then repeat that, again, inserting it in, bringing it around and anchoring in place. Then for exterior, beautiful birch bark. To secure that a single strip of the Uglu. Peeling it off, and then stretching it all the way around then the second strip for the other side. It's amazing how far this will stretch, it makes it so easy. Taking the bark, setting it up, securing it and one last strip to put the two together.

Once you have your side and inside mechanics hidden, you need to add a little bit across the top just to make it so that it doesn't take quite as many flowers. Going through, cutting it down and then just piercing in. Then you're ready to start adding flowers. You might start with the carnations, just because that will tuck underneath giving depth of color. Cutting them down, helping to break the line of the container. Grouping them for a little more visual impact. Then coming in with roses. The Piano rose is so beautiful, it opens out quite luxurious. And then bringing in the Tess, also beautiful, long lasting and the contrasting colors is just amazing.

As I work I continue to group the materials so that there's more of each color blocked together. Another Piano, next to the first. Going a little taller, and then yet one more, this time a little bit shorter to draw the eye inward. You can see they have buds, going back and adding that. Letting it come up and over. Coming back with more carnations, tucking them close. Enhancing the texture and depth of color. Another of the Tess. Then as I work, filling in, thinking about adding texture and drama, bringing in the eryngium, the pods are just fabulous to cluster together. Then nestle in to add more texture.

As you finish turn it and look at it from all angles. Determine where maybe you need a little more red, maybe a little more texture. We're adding another Tess right in here. Maybe a brighter Piano on the opposite side, adding some color, tucking it in well so that it hydrates. Maybe a few more of the eryngium and one last carnation to help break the line of the container.

Then turning it, looking, confirming that the center is still beautiful and that the sides are covered and breaking the line. Balanced and symmetrical, ready to finish. To enhance the unity and the rhythm, add romance. Bringing in a candle, picking up the lighter hue of the birch bark. Then adding cranberries to help finish covering the interior mechanics. Then to enhance the rhythm and line, using beaded cranberries. It's just metallic wire and bits of the bark, cut into squares, and then just feed it on, continue with cranberries, then using a wood pick, just securing it on, wrapping it around, repeating on the opposite end, another wood pick, then just letting it drape right over, winding through, back around, repeating that, beading it on and inserting it in.

The finished design, a very contemporary, sophisticated look to the traditional red and green. By going to the split compliment, choosing two different hues of garden roses from GardenRosesDirect.com gives me a wonderful pallet to work with. For more creative inspiration, check out the website, Flower School .com. If you have questions you can reach me through there or pick up the telephone and give me a call at 503-223-8089. Now it's your turn. What are you creating this holiday season. Take a picture, post it on social media, be sure to tag Floral Design Institute that way we all can see as you create and do something you love.

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