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Simple Bespoke Design

Learning new design styles is always difficult at the beginning - new techniques, unusual forms, and often unexpected flowers are used. The bespoke design style is no exception! In this Flower School How-To Video Leanne takes away some of the mystery, and breaks down this often challenging design style for the beginner - and the advanced designer alike! Peonies, garden roses, and anthuriums are the stars in this foam-free design -- enjoy

Video Transcription

At Floral Design Institute, I get so many calls. Help me. I need to work in the Bespoke style. Today let's take away the mystery and I'll show a simple way to create Bespoke when you're first learning.

The mechanics. I started with a compote, oh, so popular, filled it with floral netting and taped it in place with waterproof tape. Then all I need is water pre-mixed with flower food and amazing flowers.

Start small, tucked in, building a base. Giving it a cut, dropping it. These hydrangeas are local. They're fabulous. They'll be long lasting as long as they're deeply down into the water. Giving them a cut, placing them in. We're going to work all the way around and am keeping them short so that they really give an anchor to the design, a visual base, adding weight. And then bringing in a bit of foliage, some ruscus, but again, keeping it low, not extending. A bit of mint, adding nice texture, again, at that lower level. Everything I do at this first beginning is tucked tight to the container to create a base level but supports all the extending flowers later.

Anthurium will be wonderful. Cutting them, setting it in. I'm going to shadow one behind the other so now going a little longer, making it more important, putting two together. The peonies, picking up that deeper hue and tucking that in but a little bit taller. And a second, also a little taller. I can repeat that and also add in a few roses. Bring in a little bit lighter hue and bringing it around to the back side so I pull the color back from front to the rear and through the center.

I have a mid-level which creates the emphasis. Now I want to enhance with extended, so a third level, which helps bring line into the design. It can be simple, like coming upwards with a bit of stock. It could be adding lightness with a little bit of nigella, letting it come out above everything else. You can come to the side, beautiful vine, letting it trail outward long and extended then repeat that with more of each, but notice how you end up with different layers. When you bring in the multiple layers like this, that's when you get the light, delicate, Bespoke look we all adore.

The recipe I used was 10 of those local hydrangeas, then three peonies, two of the anthurium, five of the garden roses, five of the stock. Then I had three stems of the nigella that I cut apart and of course ruscus and mint. It gives me a beautiful design that you can view from all sides. A little tiny bit of clematis vine to finish it off.

The Bespoke style can be a little intimidating. It's hard to relax and just listen to the flowers and let them speak, but with practice, I know you can do it. For more inspiration and education, check out the website Flower School .com. And now it's your turn. Gather your favorite flowers, relax and let the flowers speak. Create a Bespoke design. Be sure to take a picture, post it on social media and hashtag Floral Design Institute. That way we all can see what you do as you do something you love.

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