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Spring Blues Design

The spring season has an abundance of wonderful blue flowers. In this video how-to demonstration Leanne shares her passion for blue flowers including her favorites, Anemones and Muscari. The arrangement is created using a floral netting armature and fresh water to accommodate the fragile stems of these spring flowers.  You will love this finished design.  Enjoy!

Video Transcription

Welcome to the Flower School.com video library. I'm Leanne Kesler, Director of the Floral Design Institute, and today, springtime blues. We talk about winter blues, but springtime has some of the most beautiful blue flowers. My favorite, muscari. So let's get started and have fun with the springtime blues.

Staying on trend with the footed urn, that's my base. Of course, had to be blue. Adding a plastic liner because it's not waterproof. Then rather than foam for these little fragile stems, I prefer to work with floral netting, just setting that right down in, and then add water.

To accent the muscari, some beautiful pantone ultraviolet anemones, and then eryngium and brunia. To begin, I start with the heaver materials, the eryngium and the brunia, building a base. The others then can sit atop and be a little bit fuller and protected. Adding eryngium, giving it a cut, removing the sides, and then inserting it right down into the weave. Some can be a little shorter, some a little longer, radiating outward from that center point. The brunia dyed into this blue and lavender, so fabulous - great coloration. Just giving it a cut, removing the sides. You don't want that to damage and get yucky in the water. And continue radiating until you get a nice full base for the design.

The softly rounded form with some extension to give it a looser look. Now time for the muscari. Taking them, letting them drape. See how softly it falls over the edge. Bringing it back in a little further. Making sure it goes down into the water well, draping. And also adding the anemones, setting that down in. I'm going to cut. Find a perfect little spot to tuck it in, finding a hole in the weave of the netting, down into the water well. Going back. Additional blooms, radiating outward. With everything working into a central binding point. Nice and full. Bringing the color out from the back, the front, and both sides.

As you finish, it gets harder and harder to get the stems in, so you've got to be very gentle, giving it a cut, and then finding just the perfect little hole. And sometimes if you just twist it back and forth, just like so, it can wind its way in. Key is that everything goes to that central binding point. As you soon as put something in that crosses, you won't be able to get all your stems in place.

Then lastly, it's really important to add water to this design. You saw how small that cup was, which is great when it's full of water, but as these thirsty blooms drink and it drops, then we've got a problem. Be sure you keep adding water with flower food to keep it alive and fresh and fabulous.

The question is always how many did you use? In this type of a design, you can adjust based on what you have. Granted, I have almost 30 muscari in here and about 15 anemones, but you could do it with less or you could do it with more. What do you have available?

For more creative inspirations, check out the website, Flower School.com. The website contains hundreds of floral design how-to videos, floral design classes, online floral classes and DIY Flowers.

If you have questions, you can reach us there or by telephone at 503-223-8089. And I love to see what you create. With the inspiration of ultraviolet and blue for spring, what's in your world? What can you do? Take a picture. Post it on social media, tag #FlowerDesignInstitute, and let us all see your blue inspiration, because now it's your turn. Have fun and do something you love.

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