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Windswept Callas

What inspires your floral designs? Is is the flowers, a piece of artwork, or a walk through the forest? We are all inspired by something. In this Flower School How-To Video Leanne shares a stunning contemporary design. Her inspiration was the windswept vase. You will love this design. Enjoy!

Video Transcription

Welcome to the Flower School .com video library. I'm Leanne Kesler, director of the Floral Design Institute. And today I'm here to share with you a fun video called windswept callas. The inspiration, the wonderful wind swept container. The mechanics, simply water and flower food. Nothing else. It will be all natural, secured in place by themselves. The callas I've left out over-night, laying on the counter without water. In doing so I can take them and manipulate, massaging to get nice draping. And that's the first step of this whole design is to take each calla and manipulate until you get nice draping.

Once they're massaged, you can see the natural drape is fabulous. Then just determining the length, giving it a cut, placing it in the water, and that way it'll start to rehydrate. It won't straighten out though. It'll just rehydrate with this beautiful curve established. And taking another thinking about how I want that one placed, giving it a cut then placing it in. Wedging it tightly, maybe giving it a little bit more of a massage. And then the last one, great curvature, determining the length, then placing it so that it stairsteps the eye back, adding graceful beauty, depth by pulling it to the back and then anchored down in securely.

For visual balance, and also to help secure the stems in place we going to go back and add hydrangea on this side. It'll give me a very fluffy, wonderful contrast to the sleek callas. Just giving it a cut and then using the alum, because that'll make it last the longest, just dipping directly on the alum, and then placing it in, securing it in. Make sure I've got it right over the stems, because I want everything to stay in place. And then the last one pulling off some of the leaves, giving it a cut, dipping it in the alum, and then once again, tucking it low below the first.

Now to add some contrast, interest to the design. Some magnolia branches they've dried, they're wonderful. Just taking those and weaving that in sheltering over the top, then coming back with smaller bits. And placing it underneath, weaving, and then one more. Going a little taller, finding the spot, and weaving it, adding some movement. So you've got that wind swept, but kind of pulling back a tiny bit, guiding your eye to the focal emphasis. Then for texture, the preserved and dried fern, so grand. Just breaking it down and then sliding it in. And this last touch helps to secure everything in place. Making sure that it won't shift. Bring a little more, then turning it, looking at it from all sides and filling in with any more branches and any more fern that's needed.

The design now has most of the elements and principles, but we need a little bit more to maximize the unity for that I'm going to have used gluing and dried magnolia leaves. So they're already dry. They don't need to be in the water, using Oasis Floral Adhesive, just a bit at the base, let it begin to set and then tucking it down in, gluing it directly to the other materials picks up the brown of the branch and even the spine of the fern. Adding that darker hue just makes everything better because it enhances the unity.

The design started with the callas. So let's start the recipe there. We used three calla lilies. Then two of the hydrangea, then added the magnolia branches, two stems of the dried and preserved fern, and then one stem of magnolia leaves. Very easy, very fabulous for a windswept design.

Sometimes inspiration comes from the flowers. Other times, inspiration comes from the container. Which works for you the best? You'll find more creative inspiration at Flower School .com. If you have questions, you can reach us there or pick up the telephone and call (503) 223-8089. Now it's your turn. Get inspired, get creative, and then be sure to take a photograph, post it on social media and hashtag Floral Design Institute. That way we all can see what you do as you do something you love.

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