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Winter White Bridal Bouquet

On-Trend wedding bouquets are unique, eclectic and filled with variety and texture. In creating thus elegant winter white bouquet Leanne began with the white Mayra Garden Rose. She then added sweet peas, astrantia, astilbe and genista. The finishing accent of silver and blue completes this gorgeous bridal bouquet; perfect for a winter wedding. Enjoy!

Video Transcription

Welcome to the Flower School .com video library. I'm Leanne Kesler, director of the Floral Design Institute. And today I'm here to share with you a fabulous wedding bouquet. Perfect with winter whites. Wedding bouquets today are filled with variety and textures. The base of the design, the white Myra garden rose, always a favorite. And then adding in sweet peas, astrantia, astilbe and ginestra. Then to bring it on trend and up to date with colors, the addition of silver and blue will make it fabulous. The bouquet begins with a nice nest to support all the flowers. Eucalyptus, on trend and there's so many different varieties now. This sort of a ruffled variety of the spiral, a little bit of the feather eucalyptus. Gathering some in my hands, then going back. The Eryngium, bringing in that beautiful blue. Just lining things up, creating a spiraling base. Then thinking about the flowers, this is where you want to start your angle. Everything goes in facing one direction. Adding a rose, placing it to the side stem coming out, giving it a slight spin.

Coming in with a little bit of the sweet pea, maybe two of them. And everything's organized ahead of time. So all you have to do is tuck it in your hand and give it a turn. The astilbe always head one direction, stem the other giving it a turn. Maybe another of the astilbe. They're so beautiful. Just bring it in so that the head goes to the side. Another rose, turning. Back to the sweet peas. You can see how it starts filling in, and you just turn and angle with each bloom you add. As you're working, turn the bouquet, look at it from all sides. It's even nice to stand in front of the mirror and take a look. Then, as you want maybe a little more blue, bring it in. Maybe a little bit more of the eucalyptus. Keeping it loose, flowing. The astrantia, tucking it so that the texture comes up through the center. When you place it in your hand, if you just angle the heads and the stem, then just weave the blooms into place, you can turn it. The beautiful silver, sort of related to dusty miller.

Tucking that in and turning. Maybe doing a few stems so you get a little more

color there. Then turning. Coming back with another sweet pea, and another rose. Then once again, stand in front of a mirror looking to see if you've balanced from side to side and front to back. When the bouquet is finished, you can go back, maybe add a little more foliage to give some soft flowing movement. Eucalyptus just trailing out. Then I saved the ginestra for last, because it's very sturdy, very strong. So adding it at the base will just help support all the other blooms, so that it looks beautiful throughout the day. And just adding that in, creating almost a collar of ginestra. Which also adds wonderful, wonderful fragrance. Coming back with a little more of the feather eucalyptus. Then to tie it off, a bit of bind wire. Just cut, wrap it under your fingers and tie it off. The finished bouquet I cut down and just sat it into a vase of water to hold for the moment. Then I want to add a little more blue.

I pulled out some muscari, but they were too short to weave into the design, but they're such a beautiful color going right along with that Pantone color of the year. So to add those, using a water tube, cutting the top so that it won't be quite so tight. Then taking two or three, clustering them together, give it a cut, slide them into the tube. This way they have a water source, so they're going to hold well. Then using Oasis floral adhesive just on the base of the tube. Let it begin to dry, then you can tuck those right down into the bouquet. Working with winter whites is so fun. The recipe, I started with the 5 white Myra, the garden rose. Then 10 sweet peas, 7 astrantia, 4 eryngium, 6 of the astilbe, 7 of the silver coccia, 7 ginestra, 2 types of eucalyptus, then very last, the 10 muscari to finish it off.

Winter whites are oh so fabulous. We call it white, but it leans to blush, ivory, cream, so many different choices. You'll find more inspiration at the website, Flower School .com. If you have questions, you can reach us through there or pick up the telephone and give us a call at (503) 223-8089. And what are you going to create? Gather your favorite flowers, white, blue, or something else. Then take a picture and post it on social media, tag Floral Design Institute. That way I can see what you have done, as well as everyone else, as you do something you love.

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