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Spring Green Centerpiece

After Christmas and Valentine’s Day floral designers find the color red to be exhausting. Very simply, “we are tired of red”, spring is just around the corner and we all long for the calm and relaxing colors of springtime. In this video Leanne creates a beautiful centerpiece using the cool colors of green which are found on the opposite side of the color wheel from red. Enjoy!

Video Transcription

Welcome to the flower school .com video library. I'm Leanne Kesler, director of the Floral Design Institute. Today, I want to share with you a centerpiece. It's as far away from red is we can get. Once the holidays are over and Valentine's, the last thing in the world you want is red. We're going completely across the color wheel, and we'll look at spring green. Fabulous antidote to red.

The vessel, a fabulous ceramic boat. Now, I don't want to use tape because I don't want that to show; want to keep this delicate. Instead, I've used three anchor pins secured to the bottom, and then, wet foam soaked with flower food, just placing it in. Then one last touch, score the corners to give myself a nice, smooth surface.

As I work, I want to think low, long, horizontal line with a central binding point. We'll start with my larger blooms, maybe kale, pulling off the older petals, and reflexing, pulling it outward so it's torn. Go ahead and pull that out. Giving it a cut, the stem is so thick, doing a double cut works nicely, down towards the center to extend the line. Fragrant stock, coming out towards the end. Repeating it on the opposite side. Then, to ensure that the white is carried through from side to side so it doesn't look like just two lost arms, coming up towards the center, pulling the white through the design.

With the horizontal line established, the start of a focal emphasis; want to make sure and carry it to the opposite side, because it's a centerpiece, so it's two-sided. Bringing a second kale, facing myself, turning it so you can see. So, now I have a front on both sides. Then I simply need to fill in the form, finish the spacing, adding in some beautiful green carnations, letting them break the line, reversing it to the opposite side. Maybe darkening it with a green trick carnation, bringing in depth of color, then some beautiful green roses, carrying it out to the side, and then across to the back.

As you design, you want to think about pulling the eye from one end through the design to the other, and from one side through and back. Look for holes. Look where it might need a little bit more depth of color, some green Kermits, darker, tucked in, adds texture and color impact. If I do it in the front, bring it around to the back side, carrying your eye through. Then, looking to see where else might need a rose, maybe another carnation, and make sure that all your mechanics are concealed.

For a last touch, some delicate flowers, little scabiosa, leaving in a slight bit longer, letting them come out and over the top, adding a delicate touch to the design. Maybe some beautiful parrot tulips in the variegated green and white, cutting them quite short as they're going to continue to grow. Letting them come out towards the ends so that they'll grow with the design.

The spring green centerpiece, a perfect change from red. Looking across the color wheel to the complement, then building from there. It inspires the soul, nourishes, and guides you on. For more creative inspiration, check out the website at flower school .com. Do you have questions? You can reach us through there, or pick up the telephone and give us a call at 503-223-8089. And, as I always say, I'd love to see what you create. Gather beautiful spring green flowers and make your own arrangement. Take a photo, post it on social media, and tag Floral Design Institute. That way, we'll all see as you create and do something you love.

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